Five Funding Sources for Startup: Angel

Established Angels, Angel Groups, Entrepreneurs, Retail Investors, Investment Crowdfunding

10.6.16

In the prior three installments of the five funding sources series -- and I do recommend that you read all three -- the sources I covered share a common trait in that investing in your startup is not their primary role.

Customers, of course, play a much more vital role as your company's lifeblood. If an investor sours on you, you're in trouble. If your customers sour on you, you're done.

Self is you. And your role is to build the best product and best company that ever existed. Your investment, in terms of cash, will play its part in getting all of that started, but your time, your energy, and your leadership are the most valuable resources you can contribute.

Friends and Family bring their own issues along with their investment, and those issues will mainly revolve around managing your relationship with them as investors. That said, their existing relationship with you -- as friend or family member -- will, in most cases, come first.

With each of the final two funding sources, their primary role is as your investor. There should and most likely will be added value from these sources, in everything from connections to advice to even office space. However, when the documents are all signed, these investors are expecting a return on their investment.

So let's talk about who they are.

Funding is the most complex part of startup. How, when, and why you get funded is an individual series of choices, and every startup will take a different path. No one strategy is better than another, but you should definitely have a strategy in place before you raise a dime.

Angel investors are individuals who invest in private companies as a part of, or in lieu of, a portfolio of retail investments, like stocks or real estate.

Angel investors are actually kind of hard to pin down, and thus are sometimes the most overlooked source of capital in startup. This is not surprising though, because it's easy to get confused about the definition of an Angel, their role, and how to find them.

If you think of Angels as people with a lot of money and high risk tolerance, you're not too far off. They invest their own money. They can operate independently or as a part of a group. Some specialize in certain sectors or technologies, while others invest in whatever they think is cool. Some take almost no active role with the startup, others will want to be a formal advisor or even a part of the management team. Some make a lot of investments, others might make only one or a few.

So just about anyone with money can be an Angel, right? Well, that's close.

read the rest at: http://teachingstartup.com/five-funding-sources-for-startup-angel.asp
Let me know what you thought about this article, good or bad.

Your Email Address

Leave it blank to be anonymous



Your Thoughts?





The Fine Line Between Love and Hate in Startup
Last week, we discussed whether or not Teaching Startup should have a future.

Ideas and money falling out of pockets on Sand Hill Road
There's a lot of debate in this episode and it's all warranted and it's all around where you start your company and how much that matters.

Why Startup is a New and Different Kind of Fun
Before I started my journey at Automated Insights, I had spent a couple years consulting. But I didn't just do consulting, I went all-in on a consulting startup.

Good vs. Bad Automated Content? It's In the Context Layer
The difference between good automated content and bad automated content can be boiled down to the number of scenarios the programmer creates to turn ordinary data into beautiful prose.

Why I Wanted MATI Energy and Neuro Plus on The Startup Show
There are some obvious reasons why I wanted to get Tatiana Birgisson, founder of Mati Energy, and Jake Stauch, founder of Neuro Plus, on The Startup Show. And also some not-so-obvious reasons.